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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with m
in government circles. >> reporter: on his release, he will be given 34 lashes. this fall, the united nations human rights office declared that iranian authorities have embarked on a "severe clampdown" on journalists and human rights activists in a run-up to next june's iranian presidential elections. the iranian delegation to the u.n. dismissed the report as unfair and biased, and said the republic has worked wholeheartedly to realize the rights of its citizens. in an email to the newshour, the iranian u.n. mission claimed the report leveled "general allegations in the absence of authentic and reliable evidence aimed to serve propaganda." the communication also stated that political parties "enjoy the right of freedom of speech and free activities", and the iranians accused the u.s. of "a long list of gross and systematic violations of human rights, both at home and abroad." regime critics say they risk years in prison for their actions. abdolfattah soltani, an attorney and co-founder of the defenders of human rights center, tried to represent leaders of the minority b'hai faith. his daughte
to violence as a victory. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu thanked the leadership of the united states for its unwavering support leading up to the truce. president obama called netanyahu to say no nation should have to tolerate rocket attacks. supporting israel's right to defend itself. but hamas claimed a major win from the cease-fire saying from now on, if israel respond to attacks by bombing gaza, hamas will strike. >> the whole state of israel is a frontline. there is no front and back. >> reporter: case in point that bus bombing which left dozens injured and struck one of the busiest areas of the city across from the israeli national defense headquarters. >> there was at least a package or possibly a suicide bomber that planted a device. >> reporter: as the delicate cease-fire takes hold the temporary goal for both sides to prevent more injuries. and the white house said it hopes to use the cease-fire to help israel strengthen its internal security including addressing the smuggling of weapons into gaza by hamas. mark greenblat, abc news, new york. brandi, rob, back to you
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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